D is for Dadpe Pohe

Dadpe Pohe is quicker to put together than a packet of pot noodles. It’s a great brunch or tea recipe and another one from my Aji’s (grandmum) repertoire.

Thursdays were the days that my Aji caught up with her friends. They met as a large group, discussing the latest books and often inviting some of the authors for a talk; organizing poetry writing competitions, cookery competitions and even an annual cultural programme that included staging a play, a music recital and sometimes even a dance performance. Top marks for enthusiasm and community spirit!

On these days cooking was a chore, to be wrapped up as quickly as possible so that she could get to the club on time.

Dadpe Pohe could be rustled up in under 10 minutes and were often on the menu.

I still love them! They always make me wish that when I am old as she is, I will retain that joie de vivre.

Dadpe pohe

Dadpe pohe

Ingredients:

2 cups pohe (beaten rice or avalakki)

1.5 – 2 cups plain yoghurt

1 tablespoon oil

1 dry red chilli

a pinch of asafoetida

1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds

1/4 teaspoon cumin seeds

6-8 curry leaves

2 tablespoons chopped coriander

salt to taste

 

Method:

1. In a colander, wash and drain the pohe. Keep aside

2. Pour the yoghurt in a serving bowl. Add salt and mix well. Keep aside.

3. Heat  the oil. Add the asafoetida, mustard and cumin seeds and the red chilli. When they splutter, add the curry leaves and swirl them in the hot oil. Add this to the yoghurt and mix well.

4. Add the damp pohe into the yoghurt mixture. Mix well.

5. Garnish with coriander leaves and serve immediately.

 

Notes:

1. This dish needs to be served as soon as it is ready. If left for too long, it could turn dry as the pohe tend to absorb the yoghurt.

2. If you prefer a more runny consistency, use 2.5 cups of yoghurt and increase the quantity of spices used.

3. This is similar to Phodnicha Dahi Bhat or Curd Rice but uses Pohe instead.

4. Most communities and families have different versions of this dish, some involving coconut paste instead of yoghurt.

 

About The Weekend Baker

Weekend baker, cook book collector, gatherer of family recipes.. I have inherited my love for baking, cooking and experimenting in the kitc
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

22 Responses to D is for Dadpe Pohe

  1. Shalzzz says:

    Cool! That’s an easy recipe! Thanks for sharing! 🙂

  2. Looks good and such an easy recipe too. 🙂

  3. catchats says:

    Sounds yummy. I always love drooling over everyone’s recipes and this one is no exception.

  4. Shilpa Garg says:

    I make terrible poha. Somehow they never turn out right. Have never heard about curd in poha. Will ask the husband to try your recipe of dadpe pohe 🙂

  5. That looks so delicious, but as i am allergic to all milk products, and made ill by most spices, my ability to taste and savour such deliciousness is very limited! Oh, i wish i could! ~Liz, visiting form the A-Z http://www.lizbrownleepoet.com

    • Thanks for visiting, Liz. There’s a world of deliciousness without dairy too, as you know. I was lactose intolerant for about 2 years and am slowly reintroducing it in my diet. 🙂

  6. Hey! I have never heard of curd in pohe..I make pohe a lot but this one is different with curd and no turmeric, onion or tomatoes..That is a quick recipe too. I will give this one a try 🙂 Thank you for sharing!!

  7. Eli says:

    aww, loved to read about your grandmums Thursday gatherings- how lovely:-) food sounds yum!

  8. Rajlakshmi says:

    Although I make pose almost every weekend I have never tried this yogurt version. Sounds delicious.

  9. Debbie D. says:

    Interesting to learn about different cuisine around the world. A couple of the ingredients were unknown to me. Thanks for the education!

  10. jyotsnabhatia86 says:

    Interesting one here. Hope to try some day 🙂

Leave a Reply